Areas covered

Colliery Banners of the Coal Fields

Our villages sprung up largely because of the proximity of the coal mines. The miners were a close band of brothers whilst working  underground and also in the community with their families. They became proud Trade Unionists, members of The National Union of Coal Miners. Many mines formed brass bands and the miners displayed their allegiance to their Trade Union by commissioning Banners. The banners were carried with pride in front of their brass bands especially during the annual Miners Durham Day.
THE BANNER
THE BANNER, OUR EMBLEM FOR NUMEROUS YEARS
WAS CARRIED IN TRIUMPH OR LADEN WITH TEARS.
MARCHING THROUGH DURHAM WITH PRIDE, CHEERS AND HOPES,
BORNE BY THE POLES, THE RIBBONS AND ROPES.
ONTO THE RACECOURSE, IT WAS STOOD DOWN TO REST.
OFT - TIMES WITH BLACK CREPE ADORNING THE CREST,
A SYMBOL OF SORROW THAT HAD HAPPENED THAT YEAR,
AS FATAL DISASTERS DID OFTEN OCCUR.
THOUGHTS OF PAST STRUGGLES, UPMOST IN MINDS,
UNDAUNTED, UNITED AS COMRADESHIP BINDS. 
IT HANGS NOW WITH HONOUR IN SOME VILLAGE HALL,
NO LONGER REQUIRED TO ANSWER THE CALL.
THE BANNER – OUR EMBLEM, WE SO FREQUENTLY SAW,
IN REGAL PROCESSION WE WILL SEE IT NO MORE.
 

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